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Philippine Journal of Child Sexual Abuse – Volume 10, 2020

Review of the interviews of young men incarcerated for sexual crimes in the 2019
Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse research:
Boys and sexual violence

Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse

Lois J. Engelbrecht

Abstract

In 2019, the Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse (CPTCSA) and Family for Every Child (FeC) conducted a study that listened to and documented the voices of Filipino boys (general population, victims, and offenders), their parents, and their social workers. The purpose of the study was to increase our understanding of the socio‐cultural variables related to the cause and effect of the sexual abuse of boys. The data from this study would be the basis from which to design positive change on behalf of all children, with the focus to remember our boys. A weakness of the final study was that few boys would admit to being victims and none would admit to sexual misbehavior, especially not sexual misbehavior towards boys. The data of young offenders, referred to as actors, therefore included only those who were incarcerated for sexual crimes against girls while they were still minors. Yet the data collected was rich enough to provide insight into the attitudes of these 18 young men. It is what we learned from these young men that is the basis of this study. All people, male and female, desire connection. These young men appeared to falter in their search to connect due possibly to socio‐cultural pressures that lacked the support needed for their developing masculinity. The most prominent factors expressed by the boys included the lack of appropriate sexual education, expectations to not show vulnerable emotions, and difficulty accepting responsibility for their misbehavior.

Breaking the silence of deaf survivors of abuse: A counselor’s advocacy

Joy Cristal, Ph.D.

Abstract

Existing foreign literature and available reports from local organizations show that deaf children are highly at risk for abuse. By presenting the experiences of 28 deaf survivors of child sexual abuse, the researcher advocates for greater awareness on the need for more intensive prevention programs and appropriate counseling and treatment services for deaf people. This paper reveals how abuse happens to deaf children and its effects on them. Through this work, the deaf survivors express the need of their community for protection and healing. The researcher utilizes interviews and analysis of the participants’ disclosures. Findings show that sexual abuse happens mostly in the home committed by offenders known to deaf children. Communication problems, isolation, low‐self‐esteem and information deprivation make deaf children easy targets by offenders. The impact of abuse on the deaf children may be reinforced by the consequences of deafness such as feelings of inferiority and powerlessness. Major recommendations for treatment include counseling of the survivors and family members, group therapy, and psycho‐educational sessions. Filipino Sign Language (FSL) is prescribed as the mode of communication in all processes to be employed. Likewise, deaf affirmative approaches must be critically considered in treatment planning by professionals who are aware of Deaf culture and are competent enough in the sign language most accessible to deaf survivors.

Updated data from the Juvenile Victimization Questionnaire in a Zamboanga Del Norte school

 Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse

Abstract

The Center for the Preventioon and Treatment of Child Sexual Abuse (CPTCSA) has been conducting personal safety classes and collecting data about abuse that students experience for 20 years. The general data collected is similar to other prevalence studies. The purpose is to track the types of abuse and neglect students face in different populations to guide the development of local policies and services. This data would also track if services are successful based on increases or decreases in the types of abuse that the service targets. This paper shares the data from 1 more study in 1 school and compares the data with another study from another school in the same geographical region. It is not meant to be conclusive. Instead, the findings are preliminary and hope to help describe possible trends and discover gaps in research.